Milk (gas) station

While we were enjoying Thanksgiving dinner this year, I happened to notice that the milk bottle from our guests was unlabeled, so I asked them where it was from “von der Milchtankstelle”, came their reply. “What’s that?”, I wondered. It is basically a vending machine for fresh raw milk from a farm about a mile from our house. The German word for gas station is Tankstelle, which literally means filling place. It does not specify what you are filling. The default is assumed to be fuel for a vehicle, but in this case it is milk. We decided to try it out, and we have been very happy with it.

Besides the fact that we get local milk which means less transportation, which is good for the environment, the vending machine is open all the time, which is handy, since Spencer usually drinks at least a liter every day. They also sell fresh eggs and butter. As the weather gets nicer, I am hoping that we can make it a chore for Spencer to go get it. It is a short bike ride, and most of the way is on a bike path.

Rabbit stew

One interesting thing I have noticed here is all sorts of different meat that we don’t usually see at the grocery store in the USA, like goose, duck, deer, and rabbit. Clare recently got some frozen rabbit on sale.

First Clare baked it with some potatoes and carrots. The meat was really chewy, so we threw it all in a pot with some water and simmered it for another couple hours. Then it got very tender! An interesting taste. Sort of in between chicken and lamb. Very lean. The stew turned out very well.

Pfannekuchen!

The kids have lunch everyday at an after school program. Elementary school here gets out about noon, but the after school program helps with homework, has enrichment courses, and includes a hot lunch. One of the kids favorite lunches has been pfannekuchen, which translates to pancakes. Pancakes here are more egg-y than American pancakes, somewhere between what we think of as pancakes and crepes. We used this recipe: www.oetker.de/rezepte/r/pfannkuchen-eierkuchen.html They turned out great and were a big hit!

I is for Indian

Meg is starting to learn cursive, and I noticed today that her book lists Indian (feather not dot) as the example word for the letter I. This would not be politically correct in the USA. Then again, Germans don’t make jokes about Hitler or Nazis, the dark sides of their past. Also, they still learn cursive in Germany, and by 4th grade, are expected to do most of their work in cursive, using a refillable fountain pen!